High fruit intake linked with lower breast cancer risk

A new study this week has shed new light on a possible link between diet and breast cancer. The new study reports that high fruit consumption during adolescence may be associated with lower breast cancer risk.

Fruit and vegetables are thought to protect against breast cancer, but the evidence is conflicting. Most studies have assessed intakes during midlife and later, which may be after the period when breast tissue is most vulnerable to carcinogenic influences. So a team of US researchers wanted to see whether fruit and vegetable consumption might affect subsequent breast cancer risk. They followed 90,000 nurses for over 20 years who reported their diet in early adulthood, of whom half also recalled their usual diet during adolescence.

High fruit consumption associated with lower cancer risk

They found that high fruit consumption during adolescence (2.9 v 0.5 servings per day) was associated with a roughly 25% lower risk of breast cancer diagnosed in middle age.

In particular, greater consumption of apple, banana and grapes during adolescence, as well as oranges and kale during early adulthood was significantly associated with a reduced breast cancer risk.

Fruit has many beneficial health effects

The authors say their findings are in line with cancer prevention advice to eat more fruits and vegetables, and suggest that food choices during adolescence may be particularly important.

In a linked editorial, University of Oxford researchers say "much more evidence is needed before we can draw conclusions on the reported protective association between adolescent fruit intake and breast cancer risk." But that these foods "have well known beneficial effects on health, and efforts should continue to increase intake of both fruit and vegetables at all ages."

The study is observational, so its interpretation needs to consider the potential impact of other factors before any firm conclusions can be drawn about cause and effect, they add.

More Information


To read the full article click here.

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Sourced from Science Daily
24 May 2016

Sourced from
Science Daily

24 May 2016

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